You Can Beat Prostate Cancer: And You Don’t Need Surgery to Do It


The task of choosing the right prostate cancer treatment is daunting. It is further complicated by conflicting information the patient receives from physicians and the Internet. This book is written by a prostate cancer survivor who now runs an internatio

$ 9.30


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0 thoughts on “You Can Beat Prostate Cancer: And You Don’t Need Surgery to Do It

  1. 53 of 54 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Prostate Cancer Questions? Save time, start here, March 26, 2007
    By 
    L. Hagemann “Avid reader” (Durham, NC United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: You Can Beat Prostate Cancer: And You Don’t Need Surgery to Do It (Paperback)
    After the intial blow of “the news”, what’s next? Prostate cancer aims for all of us males. For some it will be a long time. For others (such as myself) it will be too soon. Tens of thousands of males every year repeatedly ask the question of their doctors and friends: “What would you do?” — Listen to what they tell you, but first read Bob Marckini’s book so that you know what to expect and how you might predict their answer. The amount of disinformation out there is amazing. Just now the Internet is coming alive with great information, but it takes much time to sort it out. Bob Marckini has done that. And he provided valuable feedback from actual patients (try getting that from your urologist)in addition to intriguing web sites world-wide. New literature is appearing daily…he takes you there. Where are the last approaches being done? You don’t want to settle for the last doctor in the graduating class, do you? Find out how to listen to your doctor, your wife, your friends and others in this prostate area. If you value the quality of your life, a dry pair of pants, and a reliable “woody” from time to time, give this book a read. Bob Marckini gives us a present in this time-saving primer on how to beat prostate cancer without surgery!

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  2. 39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Grateful Reader, July 20, 2007
    By 
    D. S. Nah
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: You Can Beat Prostate Cancer: And You Don’t Need Surgery to Do It (Paperback)
    After my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer, I began researching for best treatment. In the process I have thus far purchased and read five books on the subject and read many of the latest articles and research summaries from the internet. As with other reviewers below, I give Robert Marchini’s book high marks. Unlike other books, it is written from the patients point of view and takes the readers through the process that led him to choose proton therapy as the best treatment option. He writes very sympathetically and it is really reassuring to learn about the similar struggles that prostate cancer patients commonly go through. This is an excellent book from which I gleaned invaluable insights, especially as it relates to proton radiation therapy.

    My only reservation about the usefulness of the book is that it is based on insights that were arrived at in the year 2000 before some important developments in treatment options. The most important of these is, I believe, the the introduction of robotic assisted prostactemies that are much less invasive form of surgery that results in less loss of blood and faster recovery. Mr. Marchini doesn’t really discuss this option. The other reservation that I have is lack of evaluation of Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) which was very new when Mr. Marckini was making his decision some seven years ago. Now that we have more data available, we are in a position to having to choose between proton radiation and IMRT. It is not yet clear to me which one might be better today.

    Nevertheless, I truly am grateful to Mr Marchini for introducing me to the value of proton therapy as a viable option.

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  3. 33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Cutting Through the Medical Jargon- a book with hope!, July 15, 2008
    By 
    Cherry Young (Houston, Texas USA) –

    This review is from: You Can Beat Prostate Cancer: And You Don’t Need Surgery to Do It (Paperback)
    My (then 60 year old) husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer in June of 2005 (Gleason score 8- PSA 114) by a urologist recommended to us by our general practioner. We were lucky that this urologist used at least a 12 sample (honestly at this time can’t remember if it was more, but not less) biopsy needle, because we knew nothing about the standards for this procedure at that point. This standard is pointed out very well in Mr. Marckini’s book. As with all cancer diagnoses, we were devastated. In a couple of months, we were scheduled to take a trip of a life-time to England and on to China. With assurances from the urologist (and some pills to help with the swelling in the prostate so my husband could pass urine easier and a hormone deprivation implant-chemical castration) we continued with our plans for the trip and tackled the questions concerning further treatment when we got back.

    Since this is suppose to be a book review and not a history of my husband’s prostate cancer, I’ll skip all the rest of the details of his treatment and get right to the subject. I did a tremendous amount of research on the web and read several books, including the one given to me by the urologist and written by the American Cancer Society. I have had a lot of experience with research in general and a few medical cases and some terminology, but I am not medically trained. Nevertheless, I plowed through everything I could get my hands on and sometimes grasped the microbiology and sometimes did not. In the meantime, the urologist informed us he didn’t feel surgery was an option for my husband. He “surmised” the cancer had already leaked from the prostate into surrounding lymph nodes and surgery would be useless, even though he did not have concrete evidence of such. Unbeknownst to us at the time, this was a “Godsend.” Understand this, urologist believe surgery is the “gold standard” whether it be by his hands or with the help of a robot, radiologist believe radiation is the “gold standard” whether that be seed implants or IMRT (intensity modulated radiation) and unfortunately, the oncologist are essentially left out of the picture because there are no “drugs” to potentially CURE prostate cancer.

    Because I was not satisfied with the only treatment option the urologist supported (hormone deprivation), I continued my search. That was when I found Proton therapy.

    At the time my husband underwent Proton therapy at Loma Linda, Mr. Marckini’s book was not published. Oh, how I wish it had been available when I first started my research. I actually read Mr. Marckini’s book a couple of months ago, long after my husband’s treatment was complete, treatment that his urologist neither understood or was happy about him receiving.

    Here’s the thing about Mr. Marckini’s book and what sets it apart from all others and why I wish it would have been available at the beginning of my research. It is not only complete as far as information about what is available in the medical community for treatment of prostate cancer, but it is written in a down to earth style with humor and compassion so that every man and woman can understand it and identify with it. If you are not a nuclear scientist, a doctor or other scientist nor medically trained, you will probably not find the other books easy to read and at the very least they are dry. Mr. Marckini’s book is for the common man and their wives. It puts a “human” face on the disease one in six men will face in their lifetime and helps the reader to understand that it’s not only OK to discuss the many aspects of their disease and it’s treatments, but it’s healthy for them, especially when spiced with a little humor.

    One more note. I take exception with DS Nash who wrote a July 7, 2007 review of Mr. Marckini’s book, saying she laments that he did not cover robotic assisted surgery in his book and that it was “less invasive” and an “important” development. I believe she has missed the point. It’s still surgery and with surgery all kinds of things can go wrong. One little bump of the robotic arm, for example, could cut through a man’s urethea (which runs through the prostate) and/or the seminal vessles. She also laments no discussion of IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy), although Mr. Marckini does cover photon radiation of which IMRT is a type. Again, she misses the point. “Photon” radiation is all the same generally, whether it is through seed implants (Brachytherapy) or through IMRT.

    Read Mr. Marckini’s book before you do anything else about your diagnosis of prostate cancer. If you are a certain age, read it now before you become the one in six who will develop prostate cancer. It will help you immensely if you are diagnosed.

    PS: My husband is doing very well. PSA at .01

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