Eating Animals


Like many young Americans, Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between enthusiastic carnivore and occasional vegetarian. As he became a husband, and then a father, the moral dimensions of eating became increasingly important to him. Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain why we eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them.

Traveling to the darkest corners of our dining habits, Foer raises the unspoken question behind every fish we eat, every chicken we fry, and every burger we grill. Part memoir and part investigative report, Eating Animals is a book that, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, places Jonathan Safran Foer “at the table with our greatest philosophers.”

$ 7.34


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  1. 358 of 368 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A catalyst.., November 10, 2009
    By 
    A. Moon

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Eating Animals (Hardcover)
    This book was a catalyst where I wasn’t looking for one. After the first 35 pages a light bulb started lighting up…and I feared my life was about to change. I’ve never written a book review, but after reading what Jonathon learned in his 3 + years of researching factory farming, I had to tell others to read it. He provides serious, horrific and real information. I never knew about factory farming until I read his book and googled ‘factory farming’ on the web. It was all over from there. I started watching those videos on what we do to animals-the ones we don’t want to see-and I could not stomach another bite of an animal again. I loved meat, ate it easily 3xday for all of my life, grew up near those green pastures in northern California where cows graze all day. Wow. Was I disconnected and fooled…

    What I felt, was that he did not preach about not eating animals. He presented information that I could personally relate to and grasp. For me, Jonathon felt like a messenger…where many have failed to bring light to what humans are systematically doing to animals every moment of every day. He provided very important information about 99% of the animals I used to buy and eat for my family and friends. I had no idea that the US alone consumes 10 billion animals PER YEAR. I finally woke up. One chicken has 2 wings(that they never use)–how many chicken wings come in a basket at a restaurant-6? 12? 24? I used to throw meat away after getting full. I was throwing away a life-a wasted one who suffered in life and in death. What frightened me more about this book is why is an author bringing this info to me? Where are the ongoing news specials on this?

    Jonathon’s personal tone, statistical/historical data, research team, true accounts from the field, letters, etc., left me no choice than to agree with him. Of course, he is not a farm owner, hasn’t worked on a farm, and can’t come from a place of truly understanding ‘farming’. And he doesn’t shun farming, he actually helped me realize that the farming I thought ALL animals came from–humane ones–are actually a miniscule percentage of all farms. His writing is heartwarming, but gut-wrenching. His occasional wit about the insanity of factory farming made me laugh quietly, but kept me awake at night thinking & fretting.

    Eating Animals forced me to realize the terrifying component of being lied to by these factory farms and the megacorporations that support them. I used to pay extra for organic milk & cage free eggs because I believed in Horizon Farms. I thought I was making a better choice for the animals. Ultimately, the author woke me up from a deep, deep sleep. As he eloquently presents about turkeys, how can we celebrate ‘thanks’ and ‘family’ or whatever tradition you have on Thanksgiving while the main course never saw the sun, felt the earth, a breath of fresh air, had his beak seared off with a hot blade and no pain killers, lived on top of thousands of other turkey’s and their excrement, thrown into trucks for transport hundreds of miles without food or water, and never had one true moment of ‘love.’ If having a better understanding of what love means to you, read this book.

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  2. 371 of 393 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    changing my ways, October 19, 2009
    By 
    Glenn Gutterman “Glenn” (Westfield, NJ United States) –

    This review is from: Eating Animals (Hardcover)
    I wholeheartedly recommend this book. I identified with Foer as a person who really tries to eat ethically, but whose weaknesses often get the best of him. I’ve had strong intuitions that there is something wrong with Meat today, but, like Foer reports of his own journey, those intuitions have not been strong enough for me to really change what I eat. The woman in my life, by contrast, has been a vegetarian for over a decade and never wavers. Of the many changes I’ve made to accommodate our relationship, giving up meat was never one of them. I’ve generally let the smell of bacon silence any discomfort I had with meat. That is, until reading Eating Animals. Foer’s personal narrative spoke to me more than any of the many exposes on factory farming slyly sent my way. At the same time, Eating Animals left me far more informed than I was before … It’s the standard cliché, but I really couldn’t put the book down. In place of the didactic or moralistic, Foer welcomes the reader into his life and his story. Foer is his own main character, and his own self-examination inspires the same. You won’t be the same after reading it.

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  3. 376 of 405 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best Book on the Food Industry and Foer’s Most Important, October 18, 2009
    By 
    Aaron S. Gross (California) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Eating Animals (Hardcover)
    The buzz about this book was so incredible I had to get my hands on an advanced copy. The book is like nothing else ever written on the food industry. It reads like a novel, is funny, incredibly well documented, and lets factory farmers and animal activists speak in their own words. I’ve read a lot of books on the food industry and this is by far the best. It makes other writers, even Michael Pollan, look a bit timid. Foer never preaches. He shares his own beliefs and asks us to live by our own standards, not his. Foer reveals a lot of personal information here and, since this is his first nonfiction book, it its especially interesting for readers of his previous books to see some of the fact behind his fiction. The material about his grandmother and how she survived the holocaust is really powerful. The stuff about his dog George (Foer makes a mock case for eating dogs) is hilarious. His storytelling is so compelling that you hardly realize how much information he’s conveying (there are 60 pages of notes documenting his sources, but the text itself is uncluttered by footnotes). Another unique thing about this book is that Foer actually sneaks into a factory farm in the middle of the night… Eating Animals is a serious book that could change the way you live. But what’s most impressive about it is that it is also fun to read, which is exactly what we need on a hot button topic like the contemporary food industry.

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