Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods – and Helping Your Baby to Grow Up a Happy and Confident Eater

The Natural, No-Fuss, No-Purée Method for Starting Your Baby on Solid Foods

Baby-Led Weaning explodes the myth that babies need to be spoon-fed and shows why self-feeding from the start of the weaning process is the healthiest way for your child to develop. With baby-led weaning (BLW, for short), you can skip purées and make the transition to solid food by following your baby’s cues.

At about six months, most babies are ready to join the family at the kitchen table and discover food for themselves. Baby-Led Weaning is the definitive guide to this crucial period in your child’s development, and shows you how to help your baby:

  • Participate in family meals right from the start
  • Experiment with food at his or her own pace
  • Develop new abilities, including hand-eye coordination and chewing
  • Learn to love a variety of foods and to enjoy mealtimes

Baby-led weaning became a parenting phenomenon in the UK practically overnight, inspiring a fast-growing and now international online community of parents who practice baby-led weaning—with blogs and pictures to prove it! In Baby-Led Weaning, world-leading BLW authority Gill Rapley and early BLW practitioner and coauthor Tracey Murkett deliver everything you need to know about raising healthy, confident eaters.

$ 8.82


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0 thoughts on “Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods – and Helping Your Baby to Grow Up a Happy and Confident Eater

  1. 95 of 98 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Deserves to go mainstream, January 19, 2011
    By 
    Maria (Boston, MA) –

    This review is from: Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods – and Helping Your Baby to Grow Up a Happy and Confident Eater (Paperback)
    I can’t recommend this book or this method highly enough. We turned to baby-led weaning when our daughter declined to eat solids well after her six-month birthday. We never bought into the rice-cereal orthodoxy, so we began by trying to feed her bits of avocado and banana from our fingers, but she wanted none of it. We tried pureed apples and pears, and then rice and oat cereal with breast milk, but she didn’t like being spoon-fed. While we cooled our heels for a few weeks I learned about baby-led weaning, and by about eight months she was ready to go. The key to this method is that the baby is in control — apart from placing food on her tray, you don’t actually feed her. She inspects the food, chooses what she wants, and feeds herself.

    Rapley and Murkett are careful and thorough (yet friendly and conversational) in addressing concerns about choking, allergies, and so on. But the immediate benefit of BLW is that it is SO much easier to give your baby real food than to deal with steaming and pureeing (what a bore!). Soon after we started, my daughter was eating solid apples — we’d cut them into the appropriate finger shape and she’d shave bits of apple flesh off with her two little teeth. Now she loves eating from a whole apple; I eat a chunk of it to expose the flesh, and off she goes. At nine months she has eaten uncooked apples and pears, whole cooked peas and carrot sticks, buttered whole-wheat toast, cheese, pasta, sausage, chicken, mashed potatoes, scrambled eggs, curried vegetables, and basmati rice, all using her hands, and she drinks water from a regular cup with assistance. It’s thrilling to watch her engage with new tastes and textures. She doesn’t eat everything we offer, but she’s getting more and more enthusiastic about new things. She surprises people at family dinners because she is well “ahead” of her thirteen-month-old cousin, who is still spoon-fed — I say that not to be competitive, but just to show how effective baby-led weaning really is. We’re so proud of how well she’s learning to eat, and a lot of the credit goes to this book for its totally intuitive (not “new,” as another reviewer argued) advice and reassurance.

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  2. 73 of 78 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    BLW is great, but you don’t need a book for it!, March 9, 2012
    By 

    This review is from: Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods – and Helping Your Baby to Grow Up a Happy and Confident Eater (Paperback)
    If your child is exclusively breastfed for 6 months, all you need to do is read the babyledweaning website, and you’re off to the races. BLW is pretty easy: you can feed baby most things that you eat (with a “don’t be stupid” rule: not so much pepper that it hurts his/her mouth, no milk except mama’s milk before 12 months, no chokable foods like raw carrots & nuts, make grapes and blueberries safer by halving or squashing them, etc.). The wonderful thing about this approach is that you don’t have to buy or cook special foods, nor do you need special apparatus and instructions. When he was 6 months old, our baby was having none of a spoon stuck in his face. But when we gave him solid food from our plates at breakfast and dinner, he played with the food for about a week, then started eating like a champ. Our 11-month-old now eats everything except meatballs (he doesn’t seem to like them), and has been drinking unassisted from a cup since about 9.5 months. It’s fun, and free. I’d read the website, save the money on this book, and spend it on bibs with sleeves instead.

    For the one commenter who said she wasn’t aware of what doctors’ associations said about BLW, I believe that NHS (National Health Service of the UK) has approved it, and it’s also quite normal in the Netherlands. Recently, a study has shown that kids who are BLW end up with healthier eating habits than mush-fed kids. Although hey, most of us were mush-fed, and we still learned how to eat eventually.

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  3. 50 of 57 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Just OK, August 2, 2011
    By 
    Julie H (Kansas City) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods – and Helping Your Baby to Grow Up a Happy and Confident Eater (Paperback)
    I am a firm believer that BLW is the ideal way to introduce your baby to solid foods. And the information presented in the book is good. However, you can find all of the basics on BLW online, so the book really isn’t necessary. We found BLW to be very intuitive, and so did not really need an “instruction manual”. I also found the information in the book to be a bit repetitive. There is really only so much to say about BLW before you just start repeating yourself! However, for someone who knows nothing about BLW, this book would probably be great.

    So it is an excellent concept, and one that I wish more parents would adapt. But the book is a bit unnecessary unless you are completely unfamiliar with BLW.

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