AARP The Other Talk: A Guide to Talking with Your Adult Children about the Rest of Your Life


A one-of-a-kind practical guide to making the tough decisions parents and their adult children inevitably face

It was a rite of passage for you to have the Talk with your kids about the beginning of life (as in the birds and the bees). As you get older, you need to have the Other Talk–about the later years of life. And you need to have it now, not after a crisis hits.

The Other Talk helps you take control of your life so when the time comes, your kids can make decisions based on what you want. This groundbreaking guide provides the practical advice and inspiration you need to have open, honest discussions about subjects that can be difficult to talk about.

Unlike other books that help adult children who are suddenly thrust into a decision-making role, The Other Talk gives you the tools to develop a strong partnership with your kids to plan for the rest of your life.

  • Who will manage your finances and how will you budget for unknown needs?
  • Where can your children find important documents they will need to help?
  • Where will you live if you need assistance?
  • What type of medical treatments do you want–and not want–and who will advocate for your needs?

The Other Talk helps you address and answer these and other questions in a calm, measured way–freeing you up to enjoy your life and your family.

$ 7.87


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0 thoughts on “AARP The Other Talk: A Guide to Talking with Your Adult Children about the Rest of Your Life

  1. 15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Practical,At times too much story-telling, September 10, 2013
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    Hydro

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    This was a practical approach to the subject. Seems like simply a guide book and the experiences of the author. The specific needs of the serious reader are skimmed over in the references. The collective list of references leads the reader down many paths to explore. Many of the suggestive ideas of collecting info are common sense or a list developed by other organizations .

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  2. 10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Necessary but Simplified!, September 12, 2013
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    This review is from: AARP The Other Talk: A Guide to Talking with Your Adult Children about the Rest of Your Life (Paperback)
    What a gift! My parents organized their affairs but we knew nothing of the details. This book got us all on the same page and after all of us read it, we sat down and talked it through. It has just enough of the nuts and bolts to be perfectly useful but not boring or overly wordy. As the “child,” you can flip through it in one night for a general plan. We were dreading the “talk” but really ended up having a great family talk and found a few “holes” in my parent’s spectacularly organized plans and details.

    It then also allowed us to use the book and my family’s talk as a springboard for my in-laws who, quite literally, had their safe deposit key hidden under a mattress. Now they’re on their way to at least sharing where that key is hidden! Our goal is a family “talk” within this year for my husband’s family too.

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  3. 4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Other Talk was Awesome!, December 12, 2013
    The Other Talk was awesome!Again, I have been blessed with reading a very interesting and informative book! Tim Prosch talks about the other talk that parents have with their children. The first talk is the sex talk, and the “other” talk is the one where parents discuss with their adult children about what they have planned/want to do with the rest of their lives. In his book, he discusses what he went through with his grandfather before he died, then we segway into his parents’ lives as they develop illnesses and go through changes. He talks about what he and his siblings went through with his parents as they tried to handle things across the country for Mom and Dad. Not easy.

    One thing that I took away from this book is the list of documents that you needed and getting them in order, something that I discussed with my father about a month ago (and it didn’t go too well!). The Parent needs to have a few things in their information notebook: the will or trust, medical information —DNR, durable healthcare power of attorney (who’s going to be responsible for making your healthcare decisions when you are unable), living will, doctors, financial information, key documents, insurance information and where to find it, tax returns, banking information, proofs of Ownership, Investment/Pension/loan information, credit card information, valuable items info, and burial/funeral information. There is a lot more to this book than I could even begin to tell you, and I finished the book with still questions that I will have to find out answers for. Tim includes questions and concerns from study groups in the book, and I learned from those, too.

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